An American enclave in Mazatlan

After a two night passage from La Paz we’ve pulled into Mazatlan’s Marina El Cid, a little piece of America in Mexico.  Its always an odd feeling to sidle up to a dock after being out of sight of land on the open ocean for a couple days, but this resort has us reminiscing on Cabo San Lucas.  English abounds, the ATM spits out dollars, and the buffet menu (ick) is heavy on burgers & fries.  Not that we don’t love the good ol’ USofA, but hanging out in this walled compound is not really what you’d call a “cultural experience.”

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View of the Marina from the hotel lobby.  Did we take a wrong turn and end up in California?

Never fear, we won’t let a little bit of ‘Mercia distract us from our mission to explore the country while keeping the boat running.

After a little r&r (read catching up on 2 nights of sleep) & securing bottom cleaning services, we hit the town for a touristy day.

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Tidepool on the Malecon on a hazy but hot day

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Art and other sophistication!

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Every city in Mexico has at least 1 impressive cathedral/church.  Mazatlan is no exception.

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The interior. Very modern and gold shiny.

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My inner consumer won this battle in the war against buying useless crap.  At least its a cute bag.

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This way to all things fun

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We heart eating well.  Craft beer + sashimi at Dock 7 = 2 happy Lenoski’s

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The Panchos house special Margaritas made table side.  Brian has been developing a palate for tequila and knew to ask for the Don Julio Reposado instead of the house.  So tasty!

In the spirit of all things America, we’re going to hang out in Mazatlan for a few days to watch the Super Bowl, then once we get a good weather window jump 80 or so miles south to Isla Isabella.  We’re both really looking forwards to this next stop, a bird sanctuary known for its Blue Footed Boobies and Frigate birds.  Like all things cruising the weather is going to dictate when we can go since the anchorage is marginal with a bottom cluttered with rocks instead of the sand we know and love.

Normal anchoring procedure on Pura Vida is to let out a bunch of chain with our heavy Rocna anchor at the end, then put the engine hard in reverse to make it dig deep into the sand.  That way we know (mostly) that if the wind or waves kick up the boat will stay put.  However, we’ve heard many a cruiser happy hour horror story of anchor chains and anchors stuck in crevasses and wrapped around boulders at the island.  We don’t carry the scuba gear it would take to retrieve the anchor if it got really stuck, so we shall wait for a nice calm weather window where we can drop the hook and just anchor on its weight without backing it down.

In the meantime the weather is warm & the beer is cold.  Life is good aboard.

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3 thoughts on “An American enclave in Mazatlan

  1. Liz – I’ve been following your blog for a while. We too have a Hunter and are planning to leave Seattle with the Coho next year. Do you have a cousin, Erin, here in Seattle? I met her last night in a bar and we had a great chat about you (if you’re Erin’s cousin!! Ha!)

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    • Hi Linda, yes I do have a cousin Erin in Seattle. What a small world! Happy you like the blog, Hunters are great boats for cruising the coast.
      Just curious, how did you find the blog? I didn’t realize anyone besides my family was following it!

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      • Yes it really is a small world!

        I found it by searching for things like Hunter, Liveaboard, Cruising etc., stumbled across it that way. I keep a list of the Hunter blogs in particular as they’re of the most interest to us. They’ve been so inspirational to us. We bought our current boat, a 2012 39, in August last year and moved aboard last week. We can’t wait to get south!

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